Aging gracefully in your career and life

An interesting essay in The Atlantic by Arthur C. Brooks:

I suspect that my own terror of professional decline is rooted in a fear of death—a fear that, even if it is not conscious, motivates me to act as if death will never come by denying any degradation in my résumé virtues. This denial is destructive, because it leads me to ignore the eulogy virtues that bring me the greatest joy.

How can I overcome this tendency? The Buddha recommends, of all things, corpse meditation: Many Theravada Buddhist monasteries in Thailand and Sri Lanka display photos of corpses in various states of decomposition for the monks to contemplate. “This body, too,” students are taught to say about their own body, “such is its nature, such is its future, such is its unavoidable fate.” At first this seems morbid. But its logic is grounded in psychological principles—and it’s not an exclusively Eastern idea. “To begin depriving death of its greatest advantage over us,” Michel de Montaigne wrote in the 16th century, “let us deprive death of its strangeness, let us frequent it, let us get used to it; let us have nothing more often in mind than death.”

Your Professional Decline Is Coming (Much) Sooner Than You Think

I’m a big fan of WeCroak, an iOS app (very much in this tradition) that reminds you five times a day that you will die. The essay has tips for managing your inevitable professional decline, but mostly this is about acceptance. There is nothing more focusing that the prospect of death. And focus is key.